Mental Health and Selfies …

I don’t follow the Kardashians, or their voluptuous bottoms.

I think I might quite like a derrière like theirs, but I wouldn’t want surgery, and if I had to do those squat exercises … Well, nope. I’d squat down once and my knackered old knees wouldn’t allow me to stand back up again. Indeed, I think I’m beyond a pert bottom. Besides, if my arse was that curvaceous, without a cut-out hole in my mattress, I wouldn’t be able to sleep on my back at night.

But enough of the Kardashian’s, let me ask you about selfies: the pouting, the posing, the need for attention and adoration culminating in the form of a love-heart-shaped ‘like’ … Is this slightly odd behaviour? In the old days it would have been called vanity, now it’s just, well, normal. What do you think?

Of course, looks fade. One day we will all be old; what was once plump and taut will soften and droop; our paper-thin skin will crease and wrinkle and ’tis a brave soul who will want to flaunt it then. So perhaps the young should embrace their beauty and youth and put it on display to all and sundry because all too soon those days are over. Perhaps.

But shouldn’t we instead of following those simply with outward beauty, start positively celebrating those who have worked hard and achieved big? Those who have struggled and conquered? Those who have their beauty within?

Or perhaps we should stop looking over the garden fence altogether at the apparently greener grass, and start watering our own instead. Or maybe, I should just start trying those squats …

Food for thought? …

Katie x

27 thoughts on “Mental Health and Selfies …”

  1. We’ve always liked looking at beautiful people. Selfies exist because it’s easy for beautiful people to take photos of themselves now instead of having a professional do it. Whenever I hear someone complain about selfies (not talking about you here as I didn’t take your post as a complaint), I imagine they’re either old and wrinkled or ugly and slightly jealous.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m definitely old and wrinkled! Not jealous though, no. And beauty is subjective. You’re right though, we do love seeing beautiful people and beautiful things … personally I also like bare unadulterated truth and honesty in a picture, person or thing. I love an old wooden desk with the marks of time, a face which shows a life lived and story waiting to be told. Perhaps it’s a quest for a little moderation and balance. Thanks for reading and commenting, it’s lovely to hear all viewpoints!

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Well Katie, where to start?!

    In short, one of the big downsides of the internet ( and to an extent, TV, magazines etc before it) is that if people are shown something often enough they start to believe it’s true/real/normal. Then, they compare themselves to that distorted normal, and if they don’t feel they match up, it can lead to self doubt, low self esteem, and so on. All based on images that weren’t real/natural in the first place. Very sad. Ask 100 avid Instagram or Facebook users whether they feel better or worse about themselves than before they used these apps, I’m sure the overwhelming majority wiuld say they felt worse.

    On the plus side, I have noticed in the last few months a far greater range of models on clothing and make up ads on TV, and in fact it’s more rare to see someone who a few years back might have been seem as a typically lithe and pretty model.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Well said … It can be terrible for magnifying low self esteem and self doubt. I do feel for young adults/kids. I think their ‘world’ is going to be a tough one. I hope that in time there will be another new thing which enthrals everyone … ideally something that involves getting out and exercising, fresh air and learning about the real world. A bit of David Attenborough crossed with Bear Grylls perhaps! Thanks for commenting and reading … I’m with you and as you say, thank goodness we’re seeing more of a range of models etc … a good step forward. Kx

      Like

  3. Funny, I was just tossing around the idea of posting a selfie… 😉 (For real! 😄)

    Seriously though, I do agree that beauty is nice and to be celebrated, but I definitely don’t generally follow any accounts that are all selfies. Then again, I have one friend who almost *only* posts selfies but she is young, beautiful and hilariously ironic in her captions… so I feel it’s almost more like a study of self rather than showing off…

    I like this topic, it’s definitely something I’ve thought about. I once read a book called “Show Your Work” by Austin Kleon, quite inspiring, and the basic theme was show your work, not your selfie. Oddly though, by the time I read the book (I think a couple years after it was published), it seemed that the author was in fact posting a few selfies… I guess no one is perfect. :)) Good book though, highly recommend to anyone figuring out whether to start a blog etc.

    I love what you said in an earlier comment reply about the old wooden desk thing. I feel the same, it doesn’t have to be about mass ideas of perfection. A selfie (or other image) can also be about truth, and it can be a way to connect with others, in this sometimes faceless online world.

    Thanks for starting this convo!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Whoop! Whoop! Thanks for this … I’m liking the idea of Austin Kleon’s book, particularly as I’m on the lookout for something new whilst my book club work out what the new one is going to be. I love it when people like your friend are ironic or self-deprecating when they write and post. I think it’s because as children it was frowned upon to be boastful … also in truth, so often someone is almost more beautiful if they don’t know it! Thanks so much for your words … it’s so good to hear what everyone thinks! Love it! Kx

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I love selfies, and I love to see other’s selfies. But I love them because (if?) they are fun. I’m usually popping my head up into some beautiful scenery (photobombing my own pics??), or in the midst of some shenangigan with my sister or friends. I find them candid, fresh, and energetic. Mine are usually silly, and/or involve my dog. Of course I don’t want to look terrible (I should at least be able to count the number of chins I appear to have on one hand, so angle is important), but I don’t think selfies in themselves are the problem.

    I see plenty of people who literally take more time to prepare, shoot, review, reshoot, criticize, reshoot, nitpick, reshoot, and scrutinize selfies than a formal photograph. In some cases, the photo is then passed around so that each person in it can “sign off” that they find it adequate for posting. In my mind, that’s the same as spending hours applying flawless makeup or creating perfect hair, which once perfect, cannot be touched, ruined, or altered without the day ending in catastrophe. Personally, that seems extremely dull to me. There is so much more to life than superficial beauty, as you say. And that’s okay, because I’m sure those people would have no use for me either. LOL!!

    Actually, I still get quite confused about *why* the Kardashians are famous. Clothing, I think? I don’t know. Moreover, I don’t actually care. They can do whatever it is they find meaningful, but even with all of their money, I’d choose my own life over theirs. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ooooh yes! I like the idea of your dog having his/her photo taken! Dogs are the absolute best aren’t they? Yesterday in the park I came across an Italian Greyhound which usually I find to be scrawny, nervous little things but I must say, this one was super cute! So much so, that having chatted with the owner, I asked if I could take a picture of it and I sent it to my husband! How sad am I!! You’re right though, I’d choose my life over theirs any day of the week. Thanks so much for your input, I just love hearing about everyone’s thoughts, and I’m with you, superficial beauty is nooooo good! Katie 💕

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I like to take the occasional selfie more because no one else takes my picture! My parents never took my picture..a terrible thing really and I would like to know I have a record of me somewhere. Maybe I will be famous one day and these old selfies will be tracked down and used to embarrass. I think if you don’t take them too seriously, don’t Photoshop or filter, or have surgery to remove the floppy bits, taking a photo isn’t so bad.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. My eyes caught the words ‘volutuous bottoms’ so I was immediately intrigued until I saw the word ‘Kardashians’ then my eyes glazed over again 🙂

    I am guilty of the occasional selfie but normally I get a horrible shock if my phone camera accidentally switches round to the selfie camera. I would not want to inflict that on the viewing public. Unless of course, like the Kardashians, someone is going to throw lots of cash at me just for doing it. Also I fear that opportunities for old beardy guys like me to gain sponsorship from cosmetics companies are limited….

    And I’m sure your bottom is perfectly nice as it is!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I love this post. A year ago I made an attempt to let myself go grey. (I am 50) but with my died dark hair it looked so old. This year, after all the die is gone, I am allowing the grey streaks and I dont mind how they blend in. It is just part of life and I have earned every one of them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely! I am 50 too and it’s a strange thing, watching the youth that we so took for granted slipping away. But you’re spot on, it’s a part of life and acceptance, whilst hard, shows grace. X

      Like

  8. Usually we reserve celebrating “outward beauty” for the homely. Nothing wrong with that, of course, it just is what it is. The mistake many make is in feeling less than because they aren’t in the pretty crew.

    That’s an inside job, though. 🤔😉

    Liked by 1 person

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